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Should I go with housefly or cicada or neither and just stick with caterpillar professor?
Sep 1, 2014 / 1 note

Should I go with housefly or cicada or neither and just stick with caterpillar professor?

Sep 1, 2014 / 45,897 notes

incaseyuhnevaknow:

chrises77o7:

convolutednormality:

sancophaleague:

Donald Andrews Jr. A Black man  and Business Owner from New York was cleared just last April After being Arrested on Drugs Charges in Scotia, New York.    Police were “suspicious” of Donald Andrews Jr.’s store, which sells incense and smoking paraphernalia, and sent undercover informants several times in March. In one of the informants visits he is seen on Andrews hidden camera planting Crack Cocaine on the counter in Andrews Store.

Andrews was arrested in April  2013 and cleared only after he asked a Grand Jury to watch the surveillance footage from his store. The informant used a cellphone photo he took of the planted drugs as evidence that Andrews was dealing, leading to his arrest.

*YES THIS IS FUCKING REAL LOOK IT UP*

The police claim that the informant has now “fled” and they haven’t found his whereabouts. The sheriff “claims” his investigators didn’t purposely framed Andrews and have the “informant” out to be some rogue agent.

FYI this same “informant” has lead to seven other drug-related arrests the Report says. 

Sounds like a Movie right? But yall still out here calling people “conspiracy theorists”. 

Andrews is now in the process of suing NYPD.

Post Made by @solar_innerg

#sancophaleague

Signal boost

Nice! Stick I too em.

Police planting crack to lock up Black people is no conspiracy theory. It’s American History (1980-present).

(via hassavocado)

Sep 1, 2014 / 2 notes

rallyyy:

The world’s cutest chef teaches you how to make pasta

machinery:

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This is important.
Sincerely,
Professor Bootsy

From the "Unbored" website:  Drawing tips from the great GARY PANTER!INTRODUCTION
Get a book-size (or paperback-size)d sketchbook. Write your name and date on an early page and maybe think of a name for it — and if you want, write the book’s name there at the front. Make it into your little painful pal. The pain goes away slowly page by page. Fill it up and do another one. It can be hard to get started. Don’t flunk yourself before you get the ball rolling.
You might want to draw more realistically or in perspective or so it looks slick — that’s is possible and there are tricks and procedures for drawing with more realism if you desire it. But drawing very realistically with great finesse can sometimes produce dead uninteresting drawings — relative, that is, to a drawing with heart and charm and effort but no great finesse.
You can make all kinds of rules for your art making, but for starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.
TIPS

1. Quickly subdivide a page into a bunch of boxes by drawing a set of generally equidistant vertical lines, then a set of horizontal lines so that you have between 6 and 12 boxes or so on the page. In each box, in turn, in the simplest way possible, name every object you can think of and draw each thing in a box, not repeating. If it is fun, keep doing this on following pages until you get tired or can’t think of more nouns. Now you see that you have some kind of ability to typify the objects in your world and that in some sense you can draw anything.
2. Choose one of the objects that came to mind that you drew and devote one page to drawing that object with your eyes closed, starting at the “nose” of the object (in outline or silhouette might be good) and following the contour you see in your mind’s eye, describing to yourself in minute detail what you know about the object. You can use your free hand to keep track of the edge of the paper and ideally your starting point so that you can work your way back to the designated nose. Don’t worry about proportion or good drawing this is all about memory and moving your hand to find the shapes you are remembering. The drawing will be a mess, but if you take your time, you will see that you know a lot more about the object than you thought.

3. Trace some drawings you like to see better what the artist’s pencil or pen is doing. Tracing helps you observe closer. Copy art you like — it can’t hurt.
4. Most people (even your favorite artists) don’t like their drawings as much as they want to. Why? Because it is easy to imagine something better. This is only ambition, which is not a bad thing — but if you can accept what you are doing, of course you will progress quicker to a more satisfying level and also accidentally make perfectly charming drawings even if they embarrass you.
5. Draw a bunch more boxes and walk down a sidewalk or two documenting where the cracks and gum and splotches and leaves and mowed grass bits are on the square. Do a bunch of those. That is how nature arranges and composes stuff. Remember these ideas — they are in your sketchbook.

6. Sit somewhere and draw fast little drawings of people who are far away enough that you can only see the big simple shapes of their coats and bags and arms and hats and feet. Draw a lot of them. People are alike yet not — reduce them to simple and achievable shapes.
7. To get better with figure drawing, get someone to pose — or use photos — and do slow drawing of hands, feet, elbows, knees, and ankles. Drawing all the bones in a skeleton is also good, because it will help you see how the bones in the arms and legs cross each other and affect the arms’ and legs’ exterior shapes. When you draw a head from the side make sure you indicate enough room behind the ears for the brain case.

8. Do line drawings looking for the big shapes, and tonal drawing observing the light situation of your subject — that is, where the light is coming from and where it makes shapes in shade on the form, and where light reflects back onto the dark areas sometimes.
9. To draw the scene in front of you, choose the middle thing in your drawing and put it in the middle of your page — then add on to the drawing from the center of the page out.

10. Don’t worry about a style. It will creep up on you and eventually you will have to undo it in order to go further. Be like a river and accept everything.
Thanks to our pal, M.A.G. for bringing this to our attention


Instant reblog always.
Sep 1, 2014 / 1,647 notes

machinery:

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

This is important.

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy

From the "Unbored" website:  Drawing tips from the great GARY PANTER!

INTRODUCTION

Get a book-size (or paperback-size)d sketchbook. Write your name and date on an early page and maybe think of a name for it — and if you want, write the book’s name there at the front. Make it into your little painful pal. The pain goes away slowly page by page. Fill it up and do another one. It can be hard to get started. Don’t flunk yourself before you get the ball rolling.

You might want to draw more realistically or in perspective or so it looks slick — that’s is possible and there are tricks and procedures for drawing with more realism if you desire it. But drawing very realistically with great finesse can sometimes produce dead uninteresting drawings — relative, that is, to a drawing with heart and charm and effort but no great finesse.

You can make all kinds of rules for your art making, but for starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.

TIPS

1. Quickly subdivide a page into a bunch of boxes by drawing a set of generally equidistant vertical lines, then a set of horizontal lines so that you have between 6 and 12 boxes or so on the page. In each box, in turn, in the simplest way possible, name every object you can think of and draw each thing in a box, not repeating. If it is fun, keep doing this on following pages until you get tired or can’t think of more nouns. Now you see that you have some kind of ability to typify the objects in your world and that in some sense you can draw anything.

2. Choose one of the objects that came to mind that you drew and devote one page to drawing that object with your eyes closed, starting at the “nose” of the object (in outline or silhouette might be good) and following the contour you see in your mind’s eye, describing to yourself in minute detail what you know about the object. You can use your free hand to keep track of the edge of the paper and ideally your starting point so that you can work your way back to the designated nose. Don’t worry about proportion or good drawing this is all about memory and moving your hand to find the shapes you are remembering. The drawing will be a mess, but if you take your time, you will see that you know a lot more about the object than you thought.

3. Trace some drawings you like to see better what the artist’s pencil or pen is doing. Tracing helps you observe closer. Copy art you like — it can’t hurt.

4. Most people (even your favorite artists) don’t like their drawings as much as they want to. Why? Because it is easy to imagine something better. This is only ambition, which is not a bad thing — but if you can accept what you are doing, of course you will progress quicker to a more satisfying level and also accidentally make perfectly charming drawings even if they embarrass you.

5. Draw a bunch more boxes and walk down a sidewalk or two documenting where the cracks and gum and splotches and leaves and mowed grass bits are on the square. Do a bunch of those. That is how nature arranges and composes stuff. Remember these ideas — they are in your sketchbook.

6. Sit somewhere and draw fast little drawings of people who are far away enough that you can only see the big simple shapes of their coats and bags and arms and hats and feet. Draw a lot of them. People are alike yet not — reduce them to simple and achievable shapes.

7. To get better with figure drawing, get someone to pose — or use photos — and do slow drawing of hands, feet, elbows, knees, and ankles. Drawing all the bones in a skeleton is also good, because it will help you see how the bones in the arms and legs cross each other and affect the arms’ and legs’ exterior shapes. When you draw a head from the side make sure you indicate enough room behind the ears for the brain case.

8. Do line drawings looking for the big shapes, and tonal drawing observing the light situation of your subject — that is, where the light is coming from and where it makes shapes in shade on the form, and where light reflects back onto the dark areas sometimes.

9. To draw the scene in front of you, choose the middle thing in your drawing and put it in the middle of your page — then add on to the drawing from the center of the page out.

10. Don’t worry about a style. It will creep up on you and eventually you will have to undo it in order to go further. Be like a river and accept everything.

Thanks to our pal, M.A.G. for bringing this to our attention

Instant reblog always.

Sep 1, 2014 / 9,492 notes

todayinhistory:

August 28th 1955: Emmett Till murdered

On this day in 1955, the 14-year-old African-American boy Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi. While visiting family in the state, Till allegedly flirted with the young white shopkeeper Carolyn Bryant while buying candy. Bryant told her husband and a few nights later he and his half-brother abducted Till and brutally tortured and murdered him. His mutilated body was found three days later in the Tallahatchie river; Till’s face was unrecognisable, but he was identified by the ring he wore engraved with his father’s initials that his mother gave him before he left for Mississppi. The viciousness of this unprovoked, racially-motivated crime sent shockwaves throughout the nation. The case drew attention to the oppression of African-Americans throughout the nation and provided a name and a face to the threat of lynching. Till’s mother Mamie, a highly educated woman who went on to become a devoted fighter for African-American equality, insisted on an open-casket funeral in order to show the world what was done to her young son. Thousands attended the funeral and thousands more saw the horrific images of Till’s body. Due to the fierce reactions the murder had engendered it was a particularly painful, but sadly expected, outcome when the all-white jury in Mississippi acquitted Till’s killers, despite Till’s great-uncle openly identifying them in court. A few months later the killers, now protected by double jeopardy laws, sold their story to Look magazine and openly confessed to the murder in chilling detail. Taking place a year after the Supreme Court outlawed school segregation in Brown v. Board of Education, the outrage over the murder galvanised the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement. 100 days after Emmett Till’s murder Rosa Parks, on her way back from a rally for Till hosted by the then-unknown Martin Luther King Jr., refused to give up her seat for a white man on an Alabama bus. This sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, thus beginning the movement that would result in the dismantling of the system of Jim Crow segregation and win successes in promoting African-American social and political equality.

(via swegener)

Sep 1, 2014 / 81 notes

wizardlysensation said: Did you go to an art university? Like what did you study? Or are studying :) It's just that I really like to draw but I'm not nearly as good as you, I cannot create good drawings on my own, I can just copy them.. So I would really like to learn how to :)

nesskain:

I studied some engineering stuff for 4 years, and went to art school for 6month and I left ‘cause I was dissapointed. This art school was known to give a lot of homeworks and so you had to draw everyday… but it was holidays to me… I was already doing 10 times more at home with my engineering study at the same time… Anyway, it was a good experience I meet a lot of good people, and my art was influence a lot by all the sharing.

I don’t know if there is a good way to learn to draw, so my exercices might work only for me. Try to find your way. Copying things is one way, you can learn from books and so on, from nothing, make some bad choices, that’s what will make your drawing style.

For my part, I’m looking for an honest art style. I was seeking for beautiful art for too long and it was one of my biggest mistake, but as I said bad choice will make your art style too.

I found out that my drawing from observation is my real drawing skill, with a lot of deformation and mistakes.

Drawing from observation and imagination is two differents way of thinking to me.

From observation, the only thing I do is to admit what I see, I don’t do construction, I don’t analyse, I don’t try to understand it. Contrary to what books and teachers say: that you should understand how things works… (but it was too late I already learned some anatomy stuff when I realized what I wanted :D).

From imagination, I start a drawing with a construction (learned from books, tips, my own tips) but I don’t trust my eyes here. With construction everything is not dynamic as my final step depends on theory and something geometrical.

So my quest right now is to be able to draw from imagination like I would do from observation. And I’m still far awayyyyyyy….

Or at least, trying to have my own construction style. But I learned way too much from books/internet to get something of my own. And again and again bad choice will make your drawing style and I don’t regret it.

I only seek for honestly.

Again, it is one way of thinking It might not work for you. Many artists doesn’t draw from observation and have rules or something else and they still do beautiful art.

Thomas Rouzière does art exactly the way I would like to have. I’m still sharing his art, but to me, his drawing from imagination and observation are the same… I’m so so jealous ahah.

http://gommette.tumblr.com/

P.S:  “Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" is the most neutral book to start drawing, it just proves that everyone can draw and it doesn’t gives you a way to "make" a drawing style. And when you get all the basic you can start studying things your own way.

sorry for my english,

cheers,

Nesskain

Sep 1, 2014 / 166,596 notes

jomasten:

fabula-unica:

underwater-carpentry:

fuckyeah-nerdery:

spankzilla85:

gamerverse:

ctrayn:

I wish Batman was depicted like this more often.  Many of his villains are mentally ill and victims of tragic circumstances, it would be nice to see him try to help them as much as he helps the people they put in danger because of their problems.

I tear up every time I watch this show.  “I had a bad day too, once.” 

Best version of Batman. Best version of Harley.

I prefer Batman when he wasn’t a ultra-paranoid nutjob.

This this one thousand times this! What I freaking hate is that that crazy, joyless version of Batman is considered the “default” or even “better” version because of stuff like shitty writers (oh hi there Frank Miller) and the Nolanverse movies, which in themselves are a deconstruction of that version of Batman. Nolanverse Batman is unsustainable. Nolanverse Batman is completely without a lot of his support network for the majority of the trilogy. Nolanverse Batman pushes people away and ends up having to stop being a superhero in order to reclaim his humanity. That is practically skywriting saying “comics Batman is obviously different to this, this is an interesting AU.” I truly love the Nolanverse movies, I think they’re brilliant, but god do I hate it when they’re misinterpreted into comics canon. Also, Nolanverse Batman isn’t full-on crazy joyless Batman either; he quips, he teases people, he fucking smiles.

Bruce Wayne’s Batman is one of, quite possibly foremost of, my favourite superheroes, but not for any of the reasons that seem to be glorified about him in those psychotic versions. Yes, he gets obsessive. Yes, he is an utter control freak. And those are his flaws, not his strengths.

You wanna talk to me about Batman’s strengths? Talk to me about the fact that he’s the adopted single father of five kids (yes I’m counting Damian because the way he was brought into the family is analogous to adoption).

Talk to me about the fact half of his information networks are made up of ex-cons he’s rehabilitated into education programs where they flourish, and the other half are Arkham inmates who he acknowledges as the leaders in their field. Talk to me about the fact that most of the time, they’re willing to give him the information he needs.

Talk to me about the fact that he became a superhero out of the self-awareness that the trauma of losing his parents so mentally scarred him that he knows he can never be well-adjusted, but he wants to use his warped perspective to do some good so no child will ever have to endure what he did again.

Talk to me about the fact that he became a governor on the board of Arkham Asylum not to persecute but to protect the inmates, because even though they perpetrate utterly abhorrent acts they are still people with rights and even the capability to one day reform.

Talk to me about how many times he’s paid for Harvey’s surgery, and the fact that Harvey still refers to Bruce as his one friend who’s always stood by him.

Talk to me about him sponsoring Harley’s parole and laughed as she backflipped with joy.

Talk to me about the fact that, because he knows he can get stupidly stubborn and out-of-control, he surrounds himself with people who refuse to take his crap (Alfred, Babs, Selina, Dick, Jim, Leslie, etc) because he knows sometimes he needs to be stopped.

The real Batman is not some psychotic sadist who hates people and never smiles.

The real Batman is a grumpy socially awkward dad with badass friends, plenty of issues but also a moral compass, a strong belief in human rights and the ability to reform… with a soft spot for people as maladjusted as him.

Accept no substitutes.

Reblogging this again for the glorious commentary. This is Batman. THIS.

I like my Batman with a human-side, yes.

(via gangrenestyle)

itscolossal:

In the Greenhouse: A Towering Figure Enclosed Within a Glass Greenhouse by Susanne Ussing
Sep 1, 2014 / 3,892 notes
Sep 1, 2014 / 87,035 notes

abakkus:

fishwifemcguinn:

hilarydesign:

kurokotetsuya:

same

same

Pretty much

2003:

image

2014:

image

just fucking draw. don’t compare yourself to other people, don’t stop because you drew a lot last tuesday and you haven’t visibly improved. it takes time, effort, and a lot of perseverance. besides, no matter how “bad” you think you are, there’s still gonna be someone who thinks the stuff you produce is the best goddamn thing they’ve ever seen in their entire life. the artist you were five years ago would have their mind fucking blown by the artist you are today. so just draw a fuckton, because every new thing you draw is one drawing better than you were before.

(via syntheticbatty)

Sep 1, 2014 / 15 notes

kochalka:

ALL THE KIDS COMPLETELY SMITTEN
ALL THE KIDS COMPLETELY LOVIN’
ALL THE KIDS WANT TO BE BITTEN
BY RATS BY THE DOZEN!

Nice song to wake up to!  This is available on a vinyl double album now: Digital Elf and Kissers.  Also, HAPPY LABOR DAY everyone!!!!  I hope there’s no rats in the hotdogs you eat later.

hahahaa holy shit